Bits from Books – 2016

In 2015, I read my first book since high school. Although, I had regularly listened to audiobooks, I had not read a book cover to cover in over a decade. I made it a point that I would use my post-lunch laziness to read.

The year began with me completing my first pass through the Harry Potter series; a stunning fact to most people my age.

Books

My final count for 2016 is as follows:

Reading total: 15

  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  • Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet
  • Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
  • Out of the Rough: Inside the Ropes with the World’s Greatest Golfers
  • The Obstacle is the Way
  • Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator
  • Ego is the Enemy
  • So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed
  • Shoe Dog
  • The Greatest Salesman in the World
  • Straight to Hell: True Tales of Decisnce, Debauchery and Billion Dollar Deals
  • Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies
  • Turning Pro

Listening total: 8

  • Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-free Productivity
  • Elon Musk: Inventing the Future
  • Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win
  • Creativity, Inc.: Overcoming the Unseen Forces That Stand in the Way of True Inspiration
  • 11/22/63
  • Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind
  • In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes our Lives
  • Coach: Lessons on the Game of Life

Bits

When I got an Amazon Kindle earlier in the year, I began keeping track of highlights and vocabulary that I was unfamiliar with and archiving my markups upon completion of a book. Below I will share some of my favorites highlights from this year’s reading.

Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator

The human mind “first believes, then evaluates,” as one psychologist put it. To that I’d add, “as long as it doesn’t get distracted first.”

Holiday, Ryan (2012-07-19). Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator (p. 183). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet

“Say, SEAL,” I say. “What would you do if there was an intruder in the house?” Slowly SEAL turns and looks at me. He holds me with an even, unemotional stare. Then he turns back to the TV without answering my question.

“No, really,” I say. “What would you do?” He shakes his head slowly. “I think you know what I’d do,” he says to the TV. “Tell me.” “I would protect the primary.” “What’s the primary?” “That’s the million-dollar question,” he says. “What is your primary, Jesse? What would hurt you the most to lose? This big-screen TV? Those gold record awards you own? Jewelry? Cash? What do you hold most dear?” “No,” I say. “None of that.” “Well?” he asks. “My wife and my son.” “Exactly, Jesse,” he says. “They’re your primary, and as long as I’m in this house they’re my primary too. You asked me what I would do. I would protect my primary at any cost. And unfortunately for you, you’re my third option.”

Itzler, Jesse (2015-11-03). Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet (p. 223). Center Street. Kindle Edition.

“SEAL, I have a problem,” I say to him. “I didn’t bring any extra underwear.” “So what?” “I can’t run without underwear.” “Nah, bro, you can’t run without legs. It’s on.”

Itzler, Jesse (2015-11-03). Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet (p. 33). Center Street. Kindle Edition.

“Money is fun to make, fun to spend, and fun to give away. That sums it all up.”

Itzler, Jesse (2015-11-03). Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet (p. 163). Center Street. Kindle Edition.

“Hey, SEAL, what do you think about when you run?” “Finishing.”

“Man, we start, and then, motherfucker, we finish.”

Itzler, Jesse (2015-11-03). Living with a SEAL: 31 Days Training with the Toughest Man on the Planet (p. 102). Center Street. Kindle Edition.

Ego is the Enemy

The need to be better than, more than, recognized for, far past any reasonable utility— that’s ego. It’s the sense of superiority and certainty that exceeds the bounds of confidence and talent.

Holiday, Ryan (2016-06-14). Ego Is the Enemy (p. 2). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Research shows that while goal visualization is important, after a certain point our mind begins to confuse it with actual progress. The same goes for verbalization. Even talking aloud to ourselves while we work through difficult problems has been shown to significantly decrease insight and breakthroughs. After spending so much time thinking, explaining, and talking about a task, we start to feel that we’ve gotten closer to achieving it. Or worse, when things get tough, we feel we can toss the whole project aside because we’ve given it our best try, although of course we haven’t.

Holiday, Ryan (2016-06-14). Ego Is the Enemy (p. 27). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

There is no excuse for not getting your education, and because the information we have before us is so vast, there is no excuse for ever ending that process either.

Holiday, Ryan (2016-06-14). Ego Is the Enemy (p. 42). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Passion typically masks a weakness. Its breathlessness and impetuousness and franticness are poor substitutes for discipline, for mastery, for strength and purpose and perseverance. You need to be able to spot this in others and in yourself, because while the origins of passion may be earnest and good, its effects are comical and then monstrous.

Holiday, Ryan (2016-06-14). Ego Is the Enemy (p. 48). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

The question to ask, when you feel pride, then, is this: What am I missing right now that a more humble person might see?

Holiday, Ryan (2016-06-14). Ego Is the Enemy (p. 77). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed

I once asked a car-crash victim what it had felt like to be in a smashup. She said her eeriest memory was how one second the car was her friend, working for her, its contours designed to fit her body perfectly, everything smooth and sleek and luxurious, and then a blink of an eye later it had become a jagged weapon of torture— like she was inside an iron maiden. Her friend had become her worst enemy.

Ronson, Jon (2015-03-31). So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed (p. 70). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

There were glimpses of a summer day through the windows, and as a corrections officer let us in, she said that tensions were high because warm days are when a person really feels incarcerated.

Ronson, Jon (2015-03-31). So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed (p. 255). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Shoe Dog

But my hope was that when I failed, if I failed, I’d fail quickly, so I’d have enough time, enough years, to implement all the hard-won lessons.

Knight, Phil (2016-04-26). Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike (Kindle Locations 1349-1350). Scribner. Kindle Edition.

And then Adidas threatened to sue. Adidas already had a new shoe named the “Azteca Gold,” a track spike they were planning to introduce at the same Olympics. No one had ever heard of it, but that didn’t stop Adidas from kicking up a fuss.
Aggravated, I drove up the mountain to Bowerman’s house to talk it all over. We sat on the wide porch, looking down at the river. It sparkled that day like a silver shoelace. He took off his ball cap, put it on again, rubbed his face. “Who was that guy who kicked the shit out of the Aztecs?” he asked. “Cortez,” I said. He grunted. “Okay. Let’s call it the Cortez.”

Knight, Phil (2016-04-26). Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike (Kindle Locations 1587-1591). Scribner. Kindle Edition.

He had a superb talent for underplaying the bad, and underplaying the good, for simply being in the moment.

Knight, Phil (2016-04-26). Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike (Kindle Locations 3310-3311). Scribner. Kindle Edition.

Turning Pro

The difference between an amateur and a professional is in their habits. An amateur has amateur habits. A professional has professional habits.

Pressfield, Steven (2012-05-30). Turning Pro (p. 20). Black Irish Books. Kindle Edition.

The amateur fears that if he turns pro and lives out his calling, he will have to live up to who he really is and what he is truly capable of.

Pressfield, Steven (2012-05-30). Turning Pro (p. 53). Black Irish Books. Kindle Edition.

When we do the work for itself alone, our pursuit of a career (or a living or fame or wealth or notoriety) turns into something else, something loftier and nobler, which we may never even have thought about or aspired to at the beginning. It turns into a practice.

Pressfield, Steven (2012-05-30). Turning Pro (p. 106). Black Irish Books. Kindle Edition.

The Obstacle is the Way

Objective judgment, now at this very moment. Unselfish action, now at this very moment. Willing acceptance— now at this very moment— of all external events. That’s all you need. —Marcus Aurelius

Holiday, Ryan (2014-05-01). The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph (Kindle Locations 223-226). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Remember, a castle can be an intimidating, impenetrable fortress, or it can be turned into a prison when surrounded.

Holiday, Ryan (2014-05-01). The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph (Kindle Locations 1374-1375). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

See things for what they are. Do what we can. Endure and bear what we must. What blocked the path now is a path. What once impeded action advances action. The Obstacle is the Way.

Holiday, Ryan (2014-05-01). The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph (Kindle Locations 2115-2118). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

The Greatest Salesman in the World

I highlighted this entire book. Read it

Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win

Discipline equals freedom.

Jocko Willink and Leif Babin (2015-10-20). Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win. St. Martin’s Press.

Onward

The real shame of my audiobook listening is the lack of ability to highlight. I hope to find a decent way to solve this problem soon.

If you have an interest in what I am looking forward to reading in 2017, you can follow along on [Goodreads].

Turning Pro: Tap Your Inner Power and Create Your Life’s Work

Pressfield, Steven

MY LIFE AS AN AMATEUR

Ambition, I have come to believe, is the most primal and sacred fundament of our being. To feel ambition and to act upon it is to embrace the unique calling of our souls. Not to act upon that ambition is to turn our backs on ourselves and on the reason for our existence.

HABITS

The difference between an amateur and a professional is in their habits. An amateur has amateur habits. A professional has professional habits.

ART AND ADDICTION

The amateur is an egotist. He takes the material of his personal pain and uses it to draw attention to himself. He creates a “life,” a “character,” a “personality.” The artist and the professional, on the other hand, have turned a corner in their minds. They have succeeded in stepping back from themselves. They have grown so bored with themselves and so sick of their petty bullshit that they can manipulate those elements the way a HazMat technician handles weapons-grade plutonium.

PULLING THE PIN, PART TWO

You and I, who are artists and entrepreneurs, live a life that’s closer to natural, if you ask me. We migrate, too. We follow the Muse instead of the sun. When one crop is picked, we hit the road and move on to the next. It’s not a bad life. It’s lonely. It’s tough. It ain’t for everyone. But, like the life of a migrant on the road, it has its compensations.

THE DEFINITION OF BORING

Something that’s boring goes nowhere. It travels in a circle. It never arrives at its destination.

ADDICTED TO FAILURE

There’s a glamour to failure that has been mined for centuries by starving poets, romantic suicides, and other self-defined doomed souls. This glamour inverts failure and turns it into “success.”

ADDICTED TO SEX

“I don’t see what all the fuss about sex is,” said the comedian. “It’s only friction.”

MY YEAR OF TURNING PRO

I read all the stuff that you’re supposed to read in college but never do, or if you do, you’re not paying attention. I read Tolstoy and Dostoevsky and Turgenev. I read Cervantes and Flaubert and Stendhal and Knut Hamsun, and I read every American except Faulkner.

A DEFINITION OF THE AMATEUR

The amateur is young and dumb. He’s innocent, he’s good-hearted, he’s well-intentioned. The amateur is brave. He’s inventive and resourceful. He’s willing to take a chance. Like Luke Skywalker, the amateur harbors noble aspirations. He has dreams. He seeks liberation and enlightenment. And he’s willing, he hopes, to pay the price. The amateur is not evil or crazy. He’s not deluded. He’s not demented. The amateur is trying to learn. The amateur is you and me. What exactly is an amateur? How does an amateur view himself and the world? What qualities characterize the amateur?

THE AMATEUR IS TERRIFIED

The amateur fears that if he turns pro and lives out his calling, he will have to live up to who he really is and what he is truly capable of.

THE AMATEUR LIVES BY THE OPINIONS OF OTHERS

Though the amateur’s identity is seated in his own ego, that ego is so weak that it cannot define itself based on its own self-evaluation. The amateur allows his worth and identity to be defined by others. The amateur craves third-party validation. The amateur is tyrannized by his imagined conception of what is expected of him. He is imprisoned by what he believes he ought to think, how he ought to look, what he ought to do, and who he ought to be.

THE AMATEUR SEEKS PERMISSION

The amateur believes that, before she can act, she must receive permission from some Omnipotent Other —a lover or spouse, a parent, a boss, a figure of authority.

HOW YOUR DAY CHANGES WHEN YOU TURN PRO

We now structure our hours not to flee from fear, but to confront it and overcome it. We plan our activities in order to accomplish an aim.

A PROFESSIONAL IS COURAGEOUS

The linebacker and the Army Ranger go into action as part of a team. But the artist and the entrepreneur enter combat alone. I take my hat off to every man or woman who does this.

THE PROFESSIONAL DOES NOT GIVE HIS POWER AWAY TO OTHERS

When we make someone into an icon, we give away our power. We say to ourselves (unconsciously), “This person possesses a quality I wish I possessed. Therefore I will worship this person in the hope that that quality will wear off on me, or I will acquire that quality by virtue of my proximity to this mentor/ sensei/ lover/ teacher/ hero.”

The amateur is an acolyte, a groupie. The professional may seek instruction or wisdom from one who is further along in mastery than he, but he does so without surrendering his self-sovereignty.

A MARINE GETS TWO SALARIES

When we do the work for itself alone, our pursuit of a career (or a living or fame or wealth or notoriety) turns into something else, something loftier and nobler, which we may never even have thought about or aspired to at the beginning. It turns into a practice.

THE PROFESSIONAL TRUSTS THE MYSTERY

She asks her students to imagine a small white box. Imagine a lid on this box. Now lift the lid. What do you find inside? Sometimes students say a diamond. Sometimes a frog. Sometimes a pomegranate. The trick is, there is always something inside the box.

TAKE WHAT THE DEFENSE GIVES YOU

Two key tenets for days when Resistance is really strong: 1. Take what you can get and stay patient. The defense may crack late in the game. 2. Play for tomorrow. Our role on tough-nut days is to maintain our composure and keep chipping away. We’re pros. We’re not amateurs. We have patience. We can handle adversity. Tomorrow the defense will give us more, and tomorrow we’ll take it. There’s a third tenet that underlies the first two: 3. We’re in this for the long haul. Our work is a practice. One bad day is nothing to us. Ten bad days are nothing.

A MODEL OF THE UNIVERSE

“There is a second self inside you —an inner, shadow Self. This self doesn’t care about you. It doesn’t love you. It has its own agenda, and it will kill you. It will kill you like cancer. It will kill you to achieve its agenda, which is to prevent you from actualizing your Self, from becoming who you really are. This shadow self is called, in the Kabbalistic lexicon, the yetzer hara. The yetzer hara, Steve, is what you would call Resistance.”

WHO IS ALL THIS FOR?

I will gladly shell out $24.95 or $9.99 or 99 cents on iTunes to read or see or listen to the 24-karat treasure that you have refined from your pain and your vision and your imagination. I need it. We all do. We’re struggling here in the trenches. That beauty, that wisdom, those thrills and chills, even that mindless escape on a rainy October afternoon —I want it. Put me down for it. The hero wanders. The hero suffers. The hero returns. You are that hero.

Vocabulary

  • Monomania – exaggerated or obsessive enthusiasm for or preoccupation with one thing.
  • Surfeit – an excessive amount of something
  • Gnostics – relating to knowledge, especially esoteric mystical knowledge.
  • Dint – an impression or hollow in a surface
  • Proffer – hold out (something) to someone for acceptance; offer
  • Anathema – something or someone that one vehemently dislikes
  • Neophyte – a person who is new to a subject, skill, or belief

Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies

Bostrom, Nick

Great expectations

Let an ultraintelligent machine be defined as a machine that can far surpass all the intellectual activities of any man however clever. Since the design of machines is one of these intellectual activities, an ultraintelligent machine could design even better machines; there would then unquestionably be an “intelligence explosion,” and the intelligence of man would be left far behind. Thus the first ultraintelligent machine is the last invention that man need ever make, provided that the machine is docile enough to tell us how to keep it under control.

Seasons of hope and despair

Accordingly, one can view artificial intelligence as a quest to find shortcuts: ways of tractably approximating the Bayesian ideal by sacrificing some optimality or generality while preserving enough to get high performance in the actual domains of interest.

Metaphorically, we can think of a probability as sand on a large sheet of paper. The paper is partitioned into areas of various sizes, each area corresponding to one possible world, with larger areas corresponding to simpler possible worlds. Imagine also a layer of sand of even thickness spread across the entire sheet: this is our prior probability distribution. Whenever an observation is made that rules out some possible worlds, we remove the sand from the corresponding areas of the paper and redistribute it evenly over the areas that remain in play. Thus, the total amount of sand on the sheet never changes, it just gets concentrated into fewer areas as observational evidence accumulates. This is a picture of learning in its purest form.

State of the art

One sympathizes with John McCarthy, who lamented: “As soon as it works, no one calls it AI anymore.”

The computer scientist Donald Knuth was struck that “AI has by now succeeded in doing essentially everything that requires ‘thinking’ but has failed to do most of what people and animals do ‘without thinking’—that, somehow, is much harder!” 60 Analyzing visual scenes, recognizing objects, or controlling a robot’s behavior as it interacts with a natural environment has proved challenging. Nevertheless, a fair amount of progress has been made and continues to be made, aided by steady improvements in hardware.

Now, it must be stressed that the demarcation between artificial intelligence and software in general is not sharp. Some of the applications listed above might be viewed more as generic software applications than as AI in particular—though this brings us back to McCarthy’s dictum that when something works it is no longer called AI.

The algorithm just does what it does; and unless it is a very special kind of algorithm, it does not care that we clasp our heads and gasp in dumbstruck horror at the absurd inappropriateness of its actions.

Opinions about the future of machine intelligence

For example, Nils Nilsson has spent a long and productive career working on problems in search, planning, knowledge representation, and robotics; he has authored textbooks in artificial intelligence; and he recently completed the most comprehensive history of the field written to date. 79 When asked about arrival dates for HLMI(“human-level machine intelligence”), he offered the following opinion: 80 10% chance: 2030 50% chance: 2050 90% chance: 2100

Vocabulary

  • Lacuna – an unfilled space or interval; a gap.

Straight to Hell: True Tales of Deviance, Debauchery, and Billion-Dollar Deals

LeFevre, John

A Felonious Mentality

He was born on third base and scored on a wild pitch, but at least he can convince his friends (and himself) that he hit a triple and stole home. The ends justify the means; that’s an important concept to understand if you want to be successful on Wall Street, and is one that boarding school taught me well.

Who you know is as important as what you do and how you are perceived is more important than any reality.

The Parental Visit

…in the universe of people who actually matter, investment bankers are still close to the bottom.

Vocabulary

  • Abetted – encourage or assist (someone) to do something wrong, in particular, to commit a crime or other offense
  • Spivs – a man, typically characterized by flashy dress, who makes a living by disreputable dealings.
  • Teetotaler – a person who never drinks alcohol.
  • Sycophantic – behaving or done in an obsequious way in order to gain advantage
  • Sanctimonious – making a show of being morally superior to other people
  • Effeminate – (of a man) having or showing characteristics regarded as typical of a woman; unmanly.
  • Reticence – the quality of being reticent; reserve

The Greatest Salesman in the World

Mandino, Og

Chapter Three

“First, you must prove to me, and more important to yourself, that you can endure the life of a salesman for it is not an easy lot you have chosen. Truly, many times have you heard me say that the rewards are great if one succeeds but the rewards are great only because so few succeed. Many succumb to despair and fail without realizing that they already possess all the tools needed to acquire great wealth. Many others face each obstacle in their path with fear and doubt and consider them as enemies when, in truth, these obstructions are friends and helpers. Obstacles are necessary for success because in selling, as in all careers of importance, victory comes only after many struggles and countless defeats. Yet each struggle, each defeat, sharpens your skills and strengths, your courage and your endurance, your ability and your confidence and thus each obstacle is a comrade-in-arms forcing you to become better … or quit. Each rebuff is an opportunity to move forward; turn away from them, avoid them, and you throw away your future.”

Never feel shame for trying and failing for he who has never failed is he who has never tried.

Chapter Seven

The bird leaped into his palm. “Thousands of your kind are outside and afraid. But you had the courage to come through the window.”

Chapter Eight

The career I have chosen is laden with opportunity yet it is fraught with heartbreak and despair and the bodies of those who have failed, were they piled one atop another, would cast a shadow down upon all the pyramids of the earth.

Failure no longer will be my payment for struggle. Just as nature made no provision for my body to tolerate pain neither has it made any provision for my life to suffer failure. Failure, like pain, is alien to my life. In the past I accepted it as I accepted pain. Now I reject it and I am prepared for wisdom and principles which will guide me out of the shadows into the sunlight of wealth, position, and happiness far beyond my most extravagant dreams until even the golden apples in the Garden of Hesperides will seem no more than my just reward.

I have lived as an onion plant. It has not pleased me.

The value of experience is overrated, usually by old men who nod wisely and speak stupidly.

Furthermore, experience is comparable to fashion; an action that proved successful today will be unworkable and impractical tomorrow.

Good habits are the key to all success. Bad habits are the unlocked door to failure. Thus, the first law I will obey, which precedeth all others is—I will form good habits and become their slave.

My actions are ruled by appetite, passion, prejudice, greed, love, fear, environment, habit, and the worst of these tyrants is habit.

Therefore, if I must be a slave to habit let me be a slave to good habits. My bad habits must be destroyed and new furrows prepared for good seed. I will form good habits and become their slave.

And what will be accomplished with this habit? Herein lies the hidden secret of all man’s accomplishments. As I repeat the words daily they will soon become a part of my active mind, but more important, they will also seep into my other mind, that mysterious source which never sleeps, which creates my dreams, and often makes me act in ways I do not comprehend. As the words of these scrolls are consumed by my mysterious mind I will begin to awake, each morning, with a vitality I have never known before. My vigor will increase, my enthusiasm will rise, my desire to meet the world will overcome every fear I once knew at sunrise, and I will be happier than I ever believed it possible to be in this world of strife and sorrow.

Chapter Nine

My reasoning they may counter; my speech they may distrust; my apparel they may disapprove; my face they may reject; and even my bargains may cause them suspicion; yet my love will melt all hearts liken to the sun whose rays soften the coldest clay.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. And how will I do this? Henceforth will I look on all things with love and I will be born again. I will love the sun for it warms my bones; yet I will love the rain for it cleanses my spirit. I will love the light for it shows me the way; yet I will love the darkness for it shows me the stars. I will welcome happiness for it enlarges my heart; yet I will endure sadness for it opens my soul. I will acknowledge rewards for they are my due; yet I will welcome obstacles for they are my challenge.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. And how will I speak? I will laud mine enemies and they will become friends; I will encourage my friends and they will become brothers. Always will I dig for reasons to applaud; never will I scratch for excuses to gossip. When I am tempted to criticize I will bite on my tongue; when I am moved to praise I will shout from the roofs.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. And how will I act? I will love all manners of men for each has qualities to be admired even though they be hidden. With love I will tear down the wall of suspicion and hate which they have built round their hearts and in its place will I build bridges so that my love may enter their souls.

I will love the ambitious for they can inspire me! I will love the failures for they can teach me. I will love the kings for they are but human; I will love the meek for they are divine. I will love the rich for they are yet lonely; I will love the poor for they are so many. I will love the young for the faith they hold; I will love the old for the wisdom they share. I will love the beautiful for their eyes of sadness; I will love the ugly for their souls of peace.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. But how will I react to the actions of others? With love. For just as love is my weapon to open the hearts of men, love is also my shield to repulse the arrows of hate and the spears of anger. Adversity and discouragement will beat against my new shield and become as the softest of rains. My shield will protect me in the market place and sustain me when I am alone. It will uplift me in moments of despair yet it will calm me in time of exultation. It will become stronger and more protective with use until one day I will cast it aside and walk unencumbered among all manners of men and, when I do, my name will be raised high on the pyramid of life.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. And how will I confront each whom I meet? In only one way. In silence and to myself I will address him and say I Love You. Though spoken in silence these words will shine in my eyes, unwrinkle my brow, bring a smile to my lips, and echo in my voice; and his heart will be opened. And who is there who will say nay to my goods when his heart feels my love?

I will greet this day with love in my heart. And most of all I will love myself. For when I do I will zealously inspect all things which enter my body, my mind, my soul, and my heart. Never will I overindulge the requests of my flesh, rather I will cherish my body with cleanliness and moderation. Never will I allow my mind to be attracted to evil and despair, rather I will uplift it with the knowledge and wisdom of the ages. Never will I allow my soul to become complacent and satisfied, rather I will feed it with meditation and prayer. Never will I allow my heart to become small and bitter, rather I will share it and it will grow and warm the earth.

I will greet this day with love in my heart. Henceforth will I love all mankind. From this moment all hate is let from my veins for I have not time to hate, only time to love. From this moment I take the first step required to become a man among men. With love I will increase my sales a hundredfold and become a great salesman. If I have no other qualities I can succeed with love alone. Without it I will fail though I possess all the knowledge and skills of the world. I will greet this day with love, and I will succeed.

Always will I take another step. If that is of no avail I will take another, and yet another.

Chapter Ten

I will persist until I succeed. I was not delivered unto this world in defeat, nor does failure course in my veins. I am not a sheep waiting to be prodded by my shepherd. I am a lion and I refuse to talk, to walk, to sleep with the sheep. I will hear not those who weep and complain, for their disease is contagious. Let them join the sheep. The slaughterhouse of failure is not my destiny.

I will never consider defeat and I will remove from my vocabulary such words and phrases as quit, cannot, unable, impossible, out of the question, improbable, failure, unworkable, hopeless, and retreat; for they are the words of fools.

Chapter Eleven

I am nature’s greatest miracle. Since the beginning of time never has there been another with my mind, my heart, my eyes, my ears, my hands, my hair, my mouth. None that came before, none that live today, and none that come tomorrow can walk and talk and move and think exactly like me. All men are my brothers yet I am different from each. I am a unique creature.

Nevermore will I be satisfied with yesterday’s accomplishments nor will I indulge, anymore, in self-praise for deeds which in reality are too small to even acknowledge.

I am here for a purpose and that purpose is to grow into a mountain, not to shrink to a grain of sand.

Chapter Twelve

Can sand flow upward in the hour glass? Will the sun rise where it sets and set where it rises? Can I relive the errors of yesterday and right them? Can I call back yesterday’s wounds and make them whole? Can I become younger than yesterday? Can I take back the evil that was spoken, the blows that were struck, the pain that was caused? No. Yesterday is buried forever and I will think of it no more.

What price dare I place on the hours ahead? I will make them priceless!

I will live this day as if it is my last. And if it is not, I shall fall to my knees and give thanks.

Chapter Thirteen

All nature is a circle of moods and I am a part of nature and so, like the tides, my moods will rise; my moods will fall.

I will learn this secret of the ages: Weak is he who permits his thoughts to control his actions; strong is he who forces his actions to control his thoughts.

Chapter Fourteen

When I am heavy with heartache I shall console myself that this too shall pass; when I am puffed with success I shall warn myself that this too shall pass. When I am strangled in poverty I shall tell myself that this too shall pass; when I am burdened with wealth I shall tell myself that this too shall pass.

Chapter Fifteen

To surpass the deeds of others is unimportant; to surpass my own deeds is all.

Chapter Seventeen

Only for guidance will I pray, that I may be shown the way to acquire these things, and my prayer will always be answered.

Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike

Knight, Phil

Part One

1962

In every religion, it seemed, self is the obstacle, the enemy. And yet Zen declares plainly that the self doesn’t exist. Self is a mirage, a fever dream, and our stubborn belief in its reality not only wastes life, but shortens it. Self is the bald-faced lie we tell ourselves daily, and happiness requires seeing through the lie, debunking it. To study the self, said the thirteenth-century Zen master Dogen, is to forget the self. Inner voice, outer voices, it’s all the same. No dividing lines.

1965

Again and again I learned that lack of equity was a leading cause of failure.

1966

Don’t tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results.

But my hope was that when I failed, if I failed, I’d fail quickly, so I’d have enough time, enough years, to implement all the hard-won lessons.

1967

And then Adidas threatened to sue. Adidas already had a new shoe named the “Azteca Gold,” a track spike they were planning to introduce at the same Olympics. No one had ever heard of it, but that didn’t stop Adidas from kicking up a fuss.

“Who was that guy who kicked the shit out of the Aztecs?” he asked. “Cortez,” I said. He grunted. “Okay. Let’s call it the Cortez.”

1968

Primary principle of all accounting: Assets equal liabilities plus equity.

1971

Shoe dogs were people who devoted themselves wholly to the making, selling, buying, or designing of shoes.

1973

He had a superb talent for underplaying the bad, and underplaying the good, for simply being in the moment.

Part Two

1977

That’s what men do when they fight. They put up walls. They pull up the drawbridge. They fill in the moat.

1980

When you make something, when you improve something, when you deliver something, when you add some new thing or service to the lives of strangers, making them happier, or healthier, or safer, or better, and when you do it all crisply and efficiently, smartly, the way everything should be done but so seldom is—you’re participating more fully in the whole grand human drama. More than simply alive, you’re helping others to live more fully, and if that’s business, all right, call me a businessman.

Night

I thought of that phrase, “It’s just business.” It’s never just business. It never will be. If it ever does become just business, that will mean that business is very bad.

Vocabulary

  • Sinewy – consisting of or resembling sinews
  • Slaking – quench or satisfy (one’s thirst)
  • Trattorias – an Italian restaurant serving simple food
  • Languorous – the state or feeling, often pleasant, of tiredness or inertia
  • Podiatry – the treatment of the feet and their ailments
  • Noisome – having an extremely offensive smell
  • Avuncular – of or relating to an uncle; kind and friendly toward a younger or less experienced person
  • Internecine – destructive to both sides in a conflict
  • Fealty – a feudal tenant’s or vassal’s sworn loyalty to a lord
  • Quotidian – of or occurring every day; daily
  • Pagoda – a Hindu or Buddhist temple or sacred building, typically a many-tiered tower, in India and East Asia.
  • Suffused – gradually spread through or over
  • Carapace – the hard upper shell of a turtle, crustacean, or arachnid.
  • Vaunted – boast about or praise (something), especially excessively
  • Quixotic – exceedingly idealistic; unrealistic and impractical
  • Machinations – engage in plots and intrigues; scheme
  • Vehement – showing strong feeling; forceful, passionate, or intense
  • Portentous – done in a pompously or overly solemn manner so as to impress
  • Wantonly – (of a cruel or violent action) deliberate and unprovoked
  • Stolid – (of a person) calm, dependable, and showing little emotion or animation.
  • Amanuensis – a literary or artistic assistant, in particular one who takes dictation or copies manuscripts.
  • Guile – sly or cunning intelligence
  • Beguiled – charm or enchant (someone), sometimes in a deceptive way
  • Quell – put an end to (a rebellion or other disorder), typically by the use of force
  • Debentures – an unsecured loan certificate issued by a company, backed by general credit rather than by specified assets.
  • Paradigmatic – of the nature of a paradigm or model
  • Denouement – the final part of a play, movie, or narrative in which the strands of the plot are drawn together and matters are explained or resolved
  • Fetid – smelling extremely unpleasant
  • Subterfuge – deceit used in order to achieve one’s goal
  • Gabardine – a smooth, durable twill-woven cloth, typically of worsted or cotton
  • Ginkgo – a deciduous Chinese tree related to the conifers, with fan-shaped leaves and yellow flowers
  • Castigating – reprimand (someone) severely
  • Mohair – the long, silky hair of the angora goat
  • Genuflecting – lower one’s body briefly by bending one knee to the ground, typically in worship or as a sign of respect
  • Guffaw – a loud and boisterous laugh
  • Fusillade – a series of shots fired or missiles thrown all at the same time or in quick succession
  • Bacchanal – an occasion of wild and drunken revelry
  • Coterie – a small group of people with shared interests or tastes, especially one that is exclusive of other people
  • Opulence – great wealth or luxuriousness
  • Feted – a celebration or festival
  • Bulwark – a defensive wall

So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed

Ronson, Jon

Two | I’m Glad I’m Not That

“Bad liars always think they’re good at it,” Michael said to me. “They’re always confident they’re defeating you.”

He meant that we all have ticking away within us something we fear will badly harm our reputation if it got out—some “I’m glad I’m not that” at the end of an “I’m glad I’m not me.” I think he was right. Maybe our secret is actually nothing horrendous. Maybe nobody would even consider it a big deal if it was exposed. But we can’t take that risk. So we keep it buried. Maybe it’s a work impropriety. Or maybe it’s just a feeling that at any moment we’ll blurt something out during some important meeting that’ll prove to everyone that we aren’t proper professional people or, in fact, functional human beings.

Three | The Wilderness

I suppose that when shamings are delivered like remotely administered drone strikes nobody needs to think about how ferocious our collective power might be. The snowflake never needs to feel responsible for the avalanche.

You combine insecurity and ambition, and you get an inability to say no to things.

Four | God That Was Awesome

I once asked a car-crash victim what it had felt like to be in a smashup. She said her eeriest memory was how one second the car was her friend, working for her, its contours designed to fit her body perfectly, everything smooth and sleek and luxurious, and then a blink of an eye later it had become a jagged weapon of torture—like she was inside an iron maiden. Her friend had become her worst enemy.

Eight | The Shame-Eradication Workshop

“As soon as the victim steps out of the pact by refusing to feel ashamed, the whole thing crumbles.”

Nine | A Town Abuzz over Prostitution and a Client List

I think we all care deeply about things that seem totally inconsequential to other people. We all carry around with us the flotsam and jetsam of perceived humiliations that actually mean nothing. We are a mass of vulnerabilities, and who knows what will trigger them?

Eleven | The Man Who Can Change the Google Search Results

But it’s odd that so many of us see shaming how free-market libertarians see capitalism, as a beautiful beast that must be allowed to run free.

Thirteen | Raquel in a Post-Shaming World

It may be somewhat paradoxical to refer to shame as a “feeling,” for while shame is initially painful, constant shaming leads to a deadening of feeling. Shame, like cold, is, in essence, the absence of warmth. And when it reaches overwhelming intensity, shame is experienced, like cold, as a feeling of numbness and deadness. In Dante’s Inferno the lowest circle of hell was a region not of flames, but of ice—absolute coldness. —JAMES GILLIGAN, Violence: Reflections on Our Deadliest Epidemic

There were glimpses of a summer day through the windows, and as a corrections officer let us in, she said that tensions were high because warm days are when a person really feels incarcerated.

Fourteen | Cats and Ice Cream and Music

We were creating a world where the smartest way to survive is to be bland.

Fifteen | Your Speed

But the Internet isn’t about us. It’s about the companies that dominate the data flows of the Internet.”

Vocabulary

  • Banalities – the fact or condition of being banal; unoriginality.
  • Maelstrom – a powerful whirlpool in the sea or a river.
  • Inviolable – never to be broken, infringed, or dishonored.
  • Prurient – having or encouraging an excessive interest in sexual matters.
  • Histrionic – overly theatrical or melodramatic in character or style.
  • Abrogation – The verbs abrogate and arrogate are quite different in meaning. While abrogate means ‘repeal (a law),’ arrogate means ‘take or claim (something) for oneself without justification,’ often in the structure arrogate something to oneself, as in the emergency committee arrogated to itself whatever powers it chose.
  • Prevaricated – speak or act in an evasive way.
  • Besotted – strongly infatuated.
  • Mews – a row or street of houses or apartments that have been converted from stables or built to look like former stables.
  • Opulent – ostentatiously rich and luxurious or lavish.
  • Denizen – an inhabitant or occupant of a particular place.
  • Inchoate – just begun and so not fully formed or developed; rudimentary.
  • Colicky – severe, often fluctuating pain in the abdomen caused by intestinal gas or obstruction in the intestines and suffered especially by babies.
  • Hitherto – until now or until the point in time under discussion.
  • Garrulous – excessively talkative, especially on trivial matters.
  • Acerbic – sharp and forthright.
  • Temerity – excessive confidence or boldness; audacity.
  • Contrition – the state of feeling remorseful and penitent.
  • Ignominy – public shame or disgrace.
  • Pilloried – a wooden framework with holes for the head and hands, in which an offender was imprisoned and exposed to public abuse.
  • Pliable – easily bent; flexible.

Ego Is the Enemy

Holiday, Ryan

THE PAINFUL PROLOGUE

The orator Demosthenes once said that virtue begins with understanding and is fulfilled by courage.

In Aristotle’s famous Ethics, he uses the analogy of a warped piece of wood to describe human nature. In order to eliminate warping or curvature, a skilled woodworker slowly applies pressure in the opposite direction—essentially, bending it straight.

INTRODUCTION

The ego we see most commonly goes by a more casual definition: an unhealthy belief in our own importance. Arrogance. Self-centered ambition.

The need to be better than, more than, recognized for, far past any reasonable utility—that’s ego. It’s the sense of superiority and certainty that exceeds the bounds of confidence and talent.

Ego is the voice that tells us we’re better than we really are, we can say ego inhibits true success by preventing a direct and honest connection to the world around us.

When we remove ego, we’re left with what is real. What replaces ego is humility, yes—but rock-hard humility and confidence. Whereas ego is artificial, this type of confidence can hold weight. Ego is stolen. Confidence is earned. Ego is self-anointed, its swagger is artifice. One is girding yourself, the other gas-lighting. It’s the difference between potent and poisonous.

PART I: ASPIRE

He wanted him to “Be affable in your relations with those who approach you, and never haughty; for the pride of the arrogant even slaves can hardly endure” and “Be slow in deliberation, but be prompt to carry out your resolves” and that the “best thing which we have in ourselves is good judgment.” Constantly train your intellect, he told him, “for the greatest thing in the smallest compass is a sound mind in a human body.”

Among men who rise to fame and leadership two types are recognizable—those who are born with a belief in themselves and those in whom it is a slow growth dependent on actual achievement. To the men of the last type their own success is a constant surprise, and its fruits the more delicious, yet to be tested cautiously with a haunting sense of doubt whether it is not all a dream. In that doubt lies true modesty, not the sham of insincere self-depreciation but the modesty of “moderation,” in the Greek sense. It is poise, not pose.

One might say that the ability to evaluate one’s own ability is the most important skill of all. Without it, improvement is impossible. And certainly ego makes it difficult every step of the way. It is certainly more pleasurable to focus on our talents and strengths, but where does that get us? Arrogance and self-absorption inhibit growth. So does fantasy and “vision.”

What is rare is not raw talent, skill, or even confidence, but humility, diligence, and self-awareness.

TALK, TALK, TALK

Silence is the respite of the confident and the strong.

“Never give reasons for what you think or do until you must. Maybe, after a while, a better reason will pop into your head.”

Research shows that while goal visualization is important, after a certain point our mind begins to confuse it with actual progress. The same goes for verbalization. Even talking aloud to ourselves while we work through difficult problems has been shown to significantly decrease insight and breakthroughs. After spending so much time thinking, explaining, and talking about a task, we start to feel that we’ve gotten closer to achieving it. Or worse, when things get tough, we feel we can toss the whole project aside because we’ve given it our best try, although of course we haven’t.

TO BE OR TO DO?

Impressing people is utterly different from being truly impressive.

BECOME A STUDENT

There is no excuse for not getting your education, and because the information we have before us is so vast, there is no excuse for ever ending that process either.

DON’T BE PASSIONATE

Remember, “zealot” is just a nice way to say “crazy person.”

Wooden wasn’t about rah-rah speeches or inspiration. He saw those extra emotions as a burden. Instead, his philosophy was about being in control and doing your job and never being “passion’s slave.”

Passion typically masks a weakness. Its breathlessness and impetuousness and franticness are poor substitutes for discipline, for mastery, for strength and purpose and perseverance. You need to be able to spot this in others and in yourself, because while the origins of passion may be earnest and good, its effects are comical and then monstrous.

How can someone be busy and not accomplish anything? Well, that’s the passion paradox.

What humans require in our ascent is purpose and realism. Purpose, you could say, is like passion with boundaries. Realism is detachment and perspective.

Make it about what you feel you must do and say, not what you care about and wish to be.

FOLLOW THE CANVAS STRATEGY

There’s one fabulous way to work all that out of your system: attach yourself to people and organizations who are already successful and subsume your identity into theirs and move both forward simultaneously.

RESTRAIN YOURSELF

I have observed that those who have accomplished the greatest results are those who “keep under the body”; are those who never grow excited or lose self-control, but are always calm, self-possessed, patient, and polite. —BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

GET OUT OF YOUR OWN HEAD

There’s no one to perform for. There is just work to be done and lessons to be learned, in all that is around us.

THE DANGER OF EARLY PRIDE

Receive feedback, maintain hunger, and chart a proper course in life. Pride dulls these senses.

“Even the tallest mountains have animals that, when they stand on it, are higher than the mountain.”

The question to ask, when you feel pride, then, is this: What am I missing right now that a more humble person might see?

WORK, WORK, WORK

Each night, before he ever had a reason to, he would flip through the box, make phone calls, write letters, or add notations about their interactions.

There is another apt Latin expression: Materiam superabat opus. (The workmanship was better than the material.)

PART II: SUCCESS

“Man is pushed by drives,” Viktor Frankl observed. “But he is pulled by values.”

MANAGING YOURSELF

The public image of Eisenhower is of the man playing golf. In reality, he was not someone who ever slacked off, but the leisure time he did have was available because he ran a tight ship.

BEWARE THE DISEASE OF ME

The Innocent Climb, Pat Riley says, is almost always followed by the “Disease of Me.” It can “strike any winning team in any year and at any moment,” and does with alarming regularity.

For us, it’s beginning to think that we’re better, that we’re special, that our problems and experiences are so incredibly different from everyone else’s that no one could possibly understand. It’s an attitude that has sunk far better people, teams, and causes than ours.

He had the same traits that everyone has—ego, self-interest, pride, dignity, ambition—but they were “tempered by a sense of humility and selflessness.”

Play for the name on the front of the jersey, he says, and they’ll remember the name on the back.

MEDITATE ON THE IMMENSITY

“When I look up in the universe, I know I’m small, but I’m also big. I’m big because I’m connected to the universe and the universe is connected to me.” We just can’t forget which is bigger and which has been here longer.

PART III: FAILURE

ALIVE TIME OR DEAD TIME?

According to Greene, there are two types of time in our lives: dead time, when people are passive and waiting, and alive time, when people are learning and acting and utilizing every second.

THE EFFORT IS ENOUGH

“Success is peace of mind, which is a direct result of self-satisfaction in knowing you made the effort to do your best to become the best that you are capable of becoming.”

Fight Club MOMENTS

In the end, the only way you can appreciate your progress is to stand on the edge of the hole you dug for yourself, look down inside it, and smile fondly at the bloody claw prints that marked your journey up the walls.

Vocabulary

  • Epicurean – a person devoted to sensual enjoyment, especially that derived from fine food and drink.
  • Maladies – a disease or ailment
  • Zeal – great energy or enthusiasm in pursuit of a cause or an objective
  • Myopic – lacking imagination, foresight, or intellectual insight
  • Noxiously – harmful, poisonous, or very unpleasant
  • Avidity – extreme eagerness or enthusiasm
  • Posits – assume as a fact; put forward as a basis of argument.
  • Assiduously – with great care and perseverance.
  • Harangue – a lengthy and aggressive speech.
  • Sycophants – a person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage.
  • Magnanimous – very generous or forgiving, especially toward a rival or someone less powerful than oneself.
  • Ennui – a feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement.
  • Fjords – a long, narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs, as in Norway and Iceland, typically formed by submergence of a glaciated valley.
  • Conscription – compulsory enlistment for state service, typically into the armed forces.
  • Machinations – engage in plots and intrigues; scheme.
  • Amalgam – a mixture or blend
  • Sycophancy – a person who acts obsequiously toward someone important in order to gain advantage.
  • Self-Effacingly – not claiming attention for oneself; retiring and modest

Trust Me, I’m Lying: Confessions of a Media Manipulator

Holiday, Ryan

Book Two: The Monster Attacks: What Blogs Mean

XVIII The Iterative Hustle: Online Journalism’s Bogus Philosophy

The poet Hesiod once wrote that rumor and gossip are a “light weight to lift up, but heavy to carry and hard to put down.”

XIX The Myth of Corrections

The human mind “first believes, then evaluates,” as one psychologist put it. To that I’d add, “as long as it doesn’t get distracted first.”

XXI The Dark Side of Snark: When Internet Humor Attacks

New Yorker critic David Denby came closest to properly defining snark in his book Snark: It’s Mean, It’s Personal, and It’s Ruining Our Conversation. He didn’t succeed entirely, but “snark attempts to steal someone’s mojo, erase her cool, annihilate her effectiveness with the nasty, insidious, rug-pulling, teasing insult, which makes reference to some generally understood shared prejudice or distaste” will do.

Conclusion: So…Where to From Here?

When intelligent people read, they ask themselves a simple question: What do I plan to do with this information?

Vocabulary

  • Schlock – cheap or inferior goods or material; trash: they peddle their schlock to willing tourists
  • Assuaging – make (an unpleasant feeling) less intense: the letter assuaged the fears of most members.
  • Demagoguery – a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular desires and prejudices rather than by using rational argument.
  • Pariah – an outcast: they were treated as social pariahs.
  • Megalomaniac – a person who is obsessed with their own power.

The Obstacle Is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph

Holiday, Ryan

Introduction

Not: This is not so bad. But: I can make this good.

Objective judgment, now at this very moment. Unselfish action, now at this very moment. Willing acceptance—now at this very moment—of all external events. That’s all you need. —MARCUS AURELIUS

PART I: PERCEPTION

RECOGNIZE YOUR POWER

There is no good or bad without us, there is only perception. There is the event itself and the story we tell ourselves about what it means.

PRACTICE OBJECTIVITY

Take your situation and pretend it is not happening to you. Pretend it is not important, that it doesn’t matter. How much easier would it be for you to know what to do? How much more quickly and dispassionately could you size up the scenario and its options? You could write it off, greet it calmly.

ALTER YOUR PERSPECTIVE

Perspective is everything. That is, when you can break apart something, or look at it from some new angle, it loses its power over you.

What we can do is limit and expand our perspective to whatever will keep us calmest and most ready for the task at hand.

IS IT UP TO YOU?

He understood that as a professional athlete his job was to parse the difference between the unlikely and the impossible.

Preface

And from what we know, he truly saw each and every one of these obstacles as an opportunity to practice some virtue: patience, courage, humility, resourcefulness, reason, justice, and creativity.

PART II: ACTION

IN PRAISE OF THE FLANK ATTACK

You don’t convince people by challenging their longest and most firmly held opinions. You find common ground and work from there. Or you look for leverage to make them listen. Or you create an alterative with so much support from other people that the opposition voluntarily abandons its views and joins your camp.

USE OBSTACLES AGAINST THEMSELVES

Remember, a castle can be an intimidating, impenetrable fortress, or it can be turned into a prison when surrounded.

CHANNEL YOUR ENERGY

To be physically and mentally loose takes no talent. That’s just recklessness. (We want right action, not action period.) To be physically and mentally tight? That’s called anxiety. It doesn’t work, either. Eventually we snap. But physical looseness combined with mental restraint? That is powerful. It’s a power that drives our opponents and competitors nuts. They think we’re toying with them. It’s maddening—like we aren’t even trying, like we’ve tuned out the world. Like we’re immune to external stressors and limitations on the march toward our goals. Because we are.

PART III: WILL

BUILD YOUR INNER CITADEL

We craft our spiritual strength through physical exercise, and our physical hardiness through mental practice (mens sana in corpore)

BUILD YOUR INNER CITADEL

During the good times, we strengthen ourselves and our bodies so that during the difficult times, we can depend on it.

Final Thoughts: The Obstacle Becomes the Way

First, see clearly. Next, act correctly. Finally, endure and accept the world as it is.

Vires acquirit eundo (We gather strength as we go).

See things for what they are. Do what we can. Endure and bear what we must. What blocked the path now is a path. What once impeded action advances action. The Obstacle is the Way.

Vocabulary

  • Ennui – a feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement.
  • Emulsified – make into or become an emulsion