February 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Prime Time

50th Known Mersenne Prime Discovered: 2^77,232,917-1

The new prime number, also known as M77232917, is calculated by multiplying together 77,232,917 twos, and then subtracting one. It is nearly one million digits larger than the previous record prime number, in a special class of extremely rare prime numbers known as Mersenne primes. It is only the 50th known Mersenne prime ever discovered, each increasingly difficult to find. Mersenne primes were named for the French monk Marin Mersenne, who studied these numbers more than 350 years ago.

Trashed

Inside the Deadly World of Private Garbage Collection

Waste and recycling work is the fifth most fatal job in America — far more deadly than serving as a police officer or a firefighter. Loggers have the highest fatality rate, followed by fishing workers, aircraft pilots and roofers. From the collection out on garbage trucks, to the processing at transfer stations and recycling centers, to the dumping at landfills, the waste industry averages about one worker fatality a week. Nationally, in 2016, 82 percent of waste-worker deaths occurred in the private sector.

From Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging:

The public is often accused of being disconnected from its military, but frankly, it’s disconnected from just about everything. Farming, mineral extraction, gas and oil production, bulk cargo transport, logging, fishing, infrastructure construction—all the industries that keep the nation going are mostly unacknowledged by the people who depend on them most.
– Sebastian Junger

You Will Never See the Same

When Your Eyes Move, So Do Your Eardrums

Without moving your head, look to your left. Now look to your right. Keep flicking your eyes back and forth, left and right.

Even if you managed to keep the rest of your body completely still, your eyeballs were not the only parts of your head that just moved. Your ears did, too. Specifically, your eardrums—the thin membranes inside each of your ears—wobbled. As your eyes flitted right, both eardrums bulged to the left, one inward and one outward. They then bounced back and forth a few times, before coming to a halt. When you looked left, they bulged to the right, and oscillated again.

[…]

They also found that the eardrums start to wobble about 10 milliseconds before the eyes. This suggests that the ears aren’t reacting to what’s happening in the eyes. Instead, Groh says, “the brain is saying: I am about to move the eyes; ears, get ready.”

And while we are on the subject of hearing, find out why nature sounds can help you sleep and relax.

As life evolved on Earth, living beings developed different sensory organs to guide them toward food, alert them to danger, and find their way around the world. Without these senses, we couldn’t have survived. But sometimes, these very senses can cause our minds to get over-stimulated. When there’s too much noise, for example, it can be really distressing, but we usually can’t just turn off our hearing.

From an evolutionary standpoint, this is beneficial to us. If there’s some danger in our environment, we can act accordingly (or wake up, if we happen to be asleep). Sudden sounds jolt us into action, get our hearts pumping, and the adrenaline and cortisol soaring in our bodies so as to prepare us for fight or flight.

But living in a stream of constant, jarring noises can be highly toxic. One of the biggest problems with urban soundscapes, according to Benfield, is that people think they’ve adjusted to them.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Ryan Holiday translates stoic ideas into modern language. I highly recommend The Obstacle is the Way or Ego is the Enemy.

The Obstacle is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph

During the good times, we strengthen ourselves and our bodies so that during the difficult times, we can depend on it.
– Ryan Holiday

Get a copy here.

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Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

January 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

The Way The World Ends: Not With A Bang But A Paperclip

Wired takes a look at Paperclips, a clicker game from Frank Lantz based on speculations in Nick Bostrom’s Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies.

In a Huffington Post interview, Bostrom makes his point much more succinctly, albeit less thorough, than a game or his book:

Suppose we have an AI whose only goal is to make as many paper clips as possible. The AI will realize quickly that it would be much better if there were no humans because humans might decide to switch it off. Because if humans do so, there would be fewer paper clips. Also, human bodies contain a lot of atoms that could be made into paper clips. The future that the AI would be trying to gear towards would be one in which there were a lot of paper clips but no humans.

Born To Be Chased

Plant Earth II has been added to Netflix. Just as interesting as the action on screen is the action behind the camera. Early last year, Vox went behind the scenes to show how the famous ‘Snake Island’ chase was filmed.

Bits from Books

This is my second year compiling some of my favorite passages from books I’ve read throughout the year.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

A Seth Godin quote from Tim Ferris’ book, Tools of Titans:

‘First, Ten,’ and it is a simple theory of marketing that says: tell ten people, show ten people, share it with ten people; ten people who already trust you and already like you. If they don’t tell anybody else, it’s not that good and you should start over. If they do tell other people, you’re on your way.”

I suppose my hope is that 10 of you might share this first issue as a way of showing me you have enjoyed it.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

December 2017

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Where We Play

Strava, an app for athletes to track their exercise, has put together a heatmap that shows the activity of athletes using their service.

A marathon PR in Berlin, a bikepacking adventure in Mongolia and a ski down the slopes in Utah. Each of these plus over a billion other Strava activities were used to create the new Heatmap. It includes over 27 billion kilometers of data, overlapping to show the most frequented spots for sport on the globe. This incredible visualization was created with 200 thousand years of movement including thousands of marathons and countless coffee rides. What looks like a multihued map of the Earth is actually the white hot visualization of over 1 billion activities on Strava.

And here is how they did it.

The Technology Behind Bitcoin

You have likely heard the buzz around cryptocurrency, and more specifically, Bitcoin. Bitcoin is exciting but the technology behind it could be far more impactful. This video will help you to understand that technology.

Paradox of Success

From Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less by Greg McKeown:

It leads to what I call “the paradox of success,” which can be summed up in four predictable phases:

PHASE 1: When we really have clarity of purpose, it enables us to succeed at our endeavor.
PHASE 2: When we have success, we gain a reputation as a “go to” person. We become “good old [insert name],” who is always there when you need him, and we are presented with increased options and opportunities.
PHASE 3: When we have increased options and opportunities, which is actually code for demands upon our time and energies, it leads to diffused efforts. We get spread thinner and thinner.
PHASE 4: We become distracted from what would otherwise be our highest level of contribution. The effect of our success has been to undermine the very clarity that led to our success in the first place.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

An enlightening book that exemplifies how important it is to belong.

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging

One way to determine what is missing in day-to-day American life may be to examine what behaviors spontaneously arise when that life is disrupted.
Junger, Sebastian

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay