November 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Code Red

The Lines of Code That Changed Everything

To shed light on the software that has tilted the world on its axis, the editors polled computer scientists, software developers, historians, policymakers, and journalists. They were asked to pick: Which pieces of code had a huge influence? Which ones warped our lives? About 75 responded with all sorts of ideas, and Slate has selected 36. It’s not a comprehensive list—it couldn’t be, given the massive welter of influential code that’s been written. (One fave of mine that didn’t make the cut: “Quicksort”! Or maybe Ada Lovelace’s Bernoulli algorithm.) Like all lists, it’s meant to provoke thought—to help us ponder anew how code undergirds our lives and how decisions made by programmers ripple into the future.

Some personal favorite: The Apollo 11 Lunar Module’s BAILOUT Code, The One-Line Virus, The HTML Hyperlink, The Code That Made a T-Shirt Illegal, RSS, The Lost Mars Climate Orbiter

Words, Words, Words

Can a Machine Learn to Write for The New Yorker?

To understand how GPT-2 writes, imagine that you’ve never learned any spelling or grammar rules, and that no one taught you what words mean. All you know is what you’ve read in eight million articles that you discovered via Reddit, on an almost infinite variety of topics (although subjects such as Miley Cyrus and the Mueller report are more familiar to you than, say, the Treaty of Versailles). You have Rain Man-like skills for remembering each and every combination of words you’ve read. Because of your predictive-text neural net, if you are given a sentence and asked to write another like it, you can do the task flawlessly without understanding anything about the rules of language. The only skill you need is being able to accurately predict the next word.

Money Buys...

What Really Happens When You Become an Overnight Millionaire?

Peter Rahal, the 33-year-old energy bar impresario who sold RxBar to Kellogg for $600 million and became something of a consumer products legend in the process, stands in the gigantic, spotless kitchen of his new Miami Beach mansion. Behind him, floor-to-ceiling windows revealed his pool, his outdoor bar, and Sunset Harbour. Throughout the house are expensive-looking modernist metal chandeliers. The kitchen drawers are filled with gold utensils.
[…]
Rahal prides himself on struggle and says that’s how he built RxBar into a breakout success. Yet now he exists in a rich person’s wonderland, where workers appear and disappear on some imperceptible schedule to clean the pool or fix the elevator, where the kitchen’s surfaces are entirely smooth and glossy. The many contradictions now swirling in Rahal’s daily existence are not lost on him. “As life moves forward,” he says, “an easier life isn’t always a better life.”

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

October 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

A Burst Bubble

The Balloon Boy Hoax—Solved!

It’s not difficult to piece it together: With a video camera rolling, Richard would launch the balloon and freak out. He’d call the FAA and get the balloon tracked. There’d be a tearful reunion when Falcon emerged from the basement, where he’d been told to hide. Richard would call back and say his son wasn’t in the basket. They’d make sure the Fort Collins newspaper knew about the stray saucer and the drama behind it. The story might go nationwide. With publicity in full force and a recording of every moment, networks would fight over the Heenes’ story.

Except Falcon didn’t hide where he was told to. He hid in the garage attic, not in the basement. He played with his cars and he fell asleep. The FAA said Richard needed to call 911. Deputies showed up. Neighbors began searching for Falcon. And then that silvery balloon was careening across our television screens. That’s why Mayumi’s reunion with Falcon was so believable: For a few hours, she and Richard honestly worried their son had been swept away.

Chess-t Day

The Grandmaster Diet: How to lose weight while barely moving

In 2004, winner Rustam Kasimdzhanov walked away from the six-game world championship having lost 17 pounds. In October 2018, Polar, a U.S.-based company that tracks heart rates, monitored chess players during a tournament and found that 21-year-old Russian grandmaster Mikhail Antipov had burned 560 calories in two hours of sitting and playing chess -- or roughly what Roger Federer would burn in an hour of singles tennis.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

September 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

A Case of the Monday's

Meet the Man Unearthing the Triumphs (and Tragedies) of Monday-Qualifier Life

Every Monday the PGA Tour holds a “small” tournament to get into the week’s “big” tournament. Four spots are up for grabs and there are often over 100 vagabonding golfers trying to play their way in.

“I think golf is thought of as so elitist, epically pro golf — private jets and big money and handing out gloves — so I don’t think people knew this side of it existed,” French says. “They know minor-league baseball because everyone’s been to a minor-league baseball game. It’s organized. Monday qualifying is just so fractured. I don’t think people knew it existed, at least your casual golf fan didn’t. They didn’t realize there were people grinding out there sleeping in cars, and I think that’s the human interest of it.”

My favorites of French’s tweets are the tweets that summarize the level of play so simply.

Brains Are Weird

What if the Placebo Effect Isn’t a Trick?

And after a quarter-century of hard work, they have abundant evidence to prove it. Give people a sugar pill, they have shown, and those patients — especially if they have one of the chronic, stress-related conditions that register the strongest placebo effects and if the treatment is delivered by someone in whom they have confidence — will improve. Tell someone a normal milkshake is a diet beverage, and his gut will respond as if the drink were low fat. Take athletes to the top of the Alps, put them on exercise machines and hook them to an oxygen tank, and they will perform better than when they are breathing room air — even if room air is all that’s in the tank. Wake a patient from surgery and tell him you’ve done an arthroscopic repair, and his knee gets better even if all you did was knock him out and put a couple of incisions in his skin. Give a drug a fancy name, and it works better than if you don’t.

You don’t even have to deceive the patients. You can hand a patient with irritable bowel syndrome a sugar pill, identify it as such and tell her that sugar pills are known to be effective when used as placebos, and she will get better, especially if you take the time to deliver that message with warmth and close attention. Depression, back pain, chemotherapy-related malaise, migraine, post-traumatic stress disorder: The list of conditions that respond to placebos — as well as they do to drugs, with some patients — is long and growing.

Screenshot Graveyard

Version Museum

Much like walking through a real-life museum, Version Museum aims to illustrate the visual, tangible elements of various versions of technology, rather than just the written history behind it. Wikipedia and other sites already do a fantastic job of detailing the story behind websites, apps, and everything else. This site focuses on observable changes over time. If you're a longtime user of a certain product, there's probably going to be some nostalgia as you look at all the previous iterations of it over the years.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

August 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

“The (C)Rapture”

On Pooping in the Dark—No Lights, No Phones, No Distractions

I used to DM during every BM. Then, one afternoon a few years ago, I slipped into a poop portal. Backpacking through remote wilderness in searing heat, I felt the telltale pang. Coffee, eggs, chorizo, and water were all rushing—screamingly—to the exits. At the nearest rest stop, I dashed into a bathroom so single-mindedly I didn’t turn on the lights and collapsed onto the toilet. The immediate release, shrouded as it was in shadow, was cosmic, like waking up from a nightmare, realizing it’s Christmas, I’m 5 years old, and can fly. Though I haven’t yet been able to recreate every condition, to this day I try to dump in total darkness: no lights, no phone, the gulf between mind and body quaked shut.

Ring, Ring

Amazon Requires Police to Shill Surveillance Cameras in Secret Agreement

Amazon’s home security company Ring has enlisted local police departments around the country to advertise its surveillance cameras in exchange for free Ring products and a “portal” that allows police to request footage from these cameras, a secret agreement obtained by Motherboard shows. The agreement also requires police to “keep the terms of this program confidential.”
[…]
People often buy and use Ring doorbell cameras under the premise that they’re making their individual homes safer. But these people aren’t just making choices for themselves. They’re consenting to surveilling everyone in their neighborhood and anyone who comes in the vicinity of their home, including friends and family, delivery workers, and anyone else.

Head out on the Highway

Americans Shouldn’t Have to Drive, but the Law Insists on It

Further entrenching automobile supremacy are laws that require landowners who build housing and office space to build housing for cars as well. In large part because of parking quotas, parking lots now cover more than a third of the land area of some U.S. cities; Houston is estimated to have 30 parking spaces for every resident. As the UCLA urban-planning professor Donald Shoup has written, this mismatch flows from legal mandates rather than market demand. Every employee who brings a car to the office essentially doubles the amount of space he takes up at work, and in urban areas his employer may be required by law to build him a $50,000 garage parking space.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Golf Architecture: Economy in Course Construction and Green-Keeping

A good golf course is a great asset to the nation. Those who harangue against land being diverted from agriculture and used for golf have little sense of proportion. Comparing the small amount of land utilised for golf with the large amount devoted to agriculture, we get infinitely more value out of the former than the latter. We all eat too much. During the Great War the majority were all the fitter for being rationed and getting a smaller amount of food, but none of us get enough fresh air, pleasurable excitement, and exercise. Health and happiness are everything in this world.
- Dr. Alister MacKenzie

Get a copy here. Cost: $3, 1 hour - easily a worthwhile exchange.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

July 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Ow

The Underground Art of Prison Tattoos

Prisoners take apart beard trimmers or CD players to get at the tiny motor, which they can adapt to make the tattoo needle go up and down quickly enough.

The needle itself is often made from a metal guitar string split in two by holding it over an open flame until it snaps in half, creating a fine point. The springs inside gel pens can also flatten into needles.

One former prisoner who now runs a tattoo shop said he used to make black ink by trapping soot in a milk carton placed over a burning pile of plastic razors or Bible pages. He would mix the leftover ash and soot with a bit of alcohol (for hygienic purposes).

Go, No Go

Apollo 11 in Real Time

This website replays the Apollo 11 mission as it happened, 50 years ago. It consists entirely of historical material, all timed to Ground Elapsed Time--the master mission clock. Footage of Mission Control, film shot by the astronauts, and television broadcasts transmitted from space and the surface of the Moon, have been painstakingly placed to the very moments they were shot during the mission, as has every photograph taken, and every word spoken.

Public Service Broadcasting - Go!

Pitch Perfect

Living with Perfect Pitch and Synaesthesia

That car horn beeps an F major chord, this kettle’s in A flat, some bedside lights get thrown out because they are out of tune with other appliances…bath taps squeak in E, this person sneezes in E flat. That printer’s in D mostly. The microwave is in the same key as the washing machine.
[…]
When I taste things, I also hear music, mainly chords – sugar and desserts almost always in major key and chocolate and coffee are particularly complex sounds, with overtones and harmonics. I love broccoli and cauliflower which are a cycle of fifths. Sushi tastes like power chords on an acoustic guitar. Lemon meringue pie is a concoction of A major chords and inversions, 7ths and minors.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

June 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Bob, Why a PDF?

A Technical and Cultural Assessment of the Mueller Report PDF

Everyone knew that the US Department of Justice and Attorney General Barr would release the Mueller Report as a PDF file.

In fact, it's safe to say that AG Barr never considered delivering anything else. No one would have even suggested a Word file, or a set of TIFF images, or a website, or an XPS file, or EPUB, or plain text. It's 2019, but it seems safe to say that they simply assumed they'd use PDF.

If you are like most people, you simply assumed it would be a PDF as well.

Why?

The Lows of Colonial’s 2019 Champion

The Complicated Kevin Na: A Case Study in the Frailty of a Golfer’s Psyche

On every swing a battle raged between his technical proficiency and mental fragility. He would stand over the ball, his mind jumbled with swing thoughts. His hands strangled the grip, his arms were knots of tension. The seconds would tick by, and he felt powerless to lift the club. Then the uncertainty would ebb just long enough to allow him to start his swing, and the resulting shot would be flawless.

Seriously painful to watch: “Pull the trigger!

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

May 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Lego Tower

Analysis: How many stacked Lego’s would it take to destroy the bottom Lego

I don’t understand any of this analysis so I’ll spoil it; It would take 454,159 Legos stacked one on top of the other to destroy the bottom brick. That is 2.7 miles of Legos...halfway up Everest.

Sunday Red

Tiger and Time

From the unique perspective of Golden Bell:

And the roars for him were unlike those even for Arnie and Jack. I think that’s because Tiger wasn’t adored like Arnie, and he wasn’t lionized like Jack. No there was something else about him, something more aspirational. I am not sure I can describe it — I am no poet, I am the subject of poetry — but as I understand it, Tiger offered to take the crowd to a place where golf had never gone. He was an astronaut. He hit shots no one had ever hit. He saw possibilities where others saw tree branches and double bogeys. He brought order to a disorderly game.

Anyway, that’s how I have heard it described.

Then, one day, something with Tiger Woods changed. One hears things, but I am not one to partake in rumors. But I could see that Tiger no longer commanded the game the way he had. The crowds still shouted for him, but their cheers were less confident and more nervous. He grew older. He seemed to have a different swing every time I saw him. And then, some years, he did not show up at all.

Strike Three

Time for Robo-umps?

This human element of the game adds color but it comes at a high cost: too many mistakes. In 2018, MLB umpires, made 34,294 incorrect ball and strike calls for an average of 14 per game or 1.6 per inning. Many umpires well exceeded this number. Some of these flubbed calls were game changing.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

April 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

M68

An Exclusive Look at an Original iPhone Prototype

Apple had developed the iPhone in secret over those two and a half years, and for many inside the company, the device had only been known by the codenames “M68” and “Purple 2.” Apple was focused on surprising everyone with the iPhone, and that meant that many of the engineers working on the original handset didn’t even know what it would eventually look like.

To achieve that level of secrecy, Apple created special prototype development boards that contained nearly all of the iPhone’s parts, spread out across a large circuit board. The Verge has obtained exclusive access to the original iPhone M68 prototype board from 2006 / 2007, thanks to Red M Sixty, a source that asked to remain anonymous. It’s the first time this board has been pictured publicly, and it provides a rare historical look at an important part of computing history, showing how Apple developed the original iPhone.

80658175170943878571660636856403766975289505440883277824000000000000

52 Cards Shuffled

Summarized:

  • Set a timer to count down 52! seconds (that's 8.0658x1067 seconds).

  • Stand on the equator, and take a step forward every billion years.

  • When you've circled the earth once, take a drop of water from the Pacific Ocean, and repeat.

  • When the Pacific Ocean is empty, lay a sheet of paper down, refill the ocean and carry on.

  • When your stack of paper reaches the sun, take a look at the timer.

The 3 left-most digits won't have changed. 8.063x1067 seconds left to go.

  • Repeat the whole process 1000 times to get 1/3 of the way through that time.

5.385x1067 seconds left to go. To kill that time you try something else.

  • Shuffle a deck of cards, deal yourself 5 card poker hand every billion years.

  • Each time you get a royal flush, buy a lottery ticket.

  • Each time that ticket wins the jackpot, throw a grain of sand in the grand canyon

  • When the grand canyon's full, take 1oz of rock off Mount Everest. Empty the canyon and start over again.

  • When Everest has been leveled, check the timer.

There's barely any change. 5.364x1067 seconds.

The timer would run out sometime during your 255th time through the process.

Feeding the Algorithm

The Internet Knows You Better Than Your Spouse Does

Then the investigators had the program examine the likes of other Facebook users. If the software had as few as 10 [likes] for analysis, it was able to evaluate that person about as well as a co-worker did. Given 70 likes, the algorithm was about as accurate as a friend. With 300 [likes], it was more successful than the person’s spouse. Even more astonishing to the researchers, feeding likes into their program enabled them to predict whether someone suffered from depression or took drugs and even to infer what the individual studied in school.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

March 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Aberdeen Air

The World’s Busiest Commercial Heliport

Aberdeen's area of responsibility over the North Sea is the same size as the entire UK landmass, approximately 100,000² nautical miles. Most of this area is ‘uncontrolled’ Class G airspace, with a number of military Danger Areas; this makes the controlling environment complex and demanding.
[…]
Tricky conditions such as strong winds, fog in summer and snow in winter provide challenges to the team in Aberdeen, with high waves around the rigs and a phenomenon called ‘triggered lightning’ (where the movement of rotor blade generates electricity between them in certain weather conditions) also affect operations, making it one of the most challenging and interested places to be an air traffic controller anywhere in the world.

NGA

Neighborhood Golf Association

For the past 10 years, street photographer Patrick Barr aka Tiger Hood has become a local legend known for bringing golf to the streets of NYC. It’s a game that requires only three items: a golf club, a newspaper-stuffed milk carton, and a crate. What was initially just a way for Barr to pass time has gained traction from major news outlets and celebrities on a global scale. However, street golf seems to overshadow his true passion… photography. Barr’s archive consists of thousands of mind blowing film photographs of NYC from the 1990’s to 2000’s. His goal was to preserve a time and place that he predicted would dissolve in the coming years. With his archive as evidence, he predicted correctly.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

February 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

“Is my brain intact?”

The Strange Brain of the World’s Greatest Solo Climber

Honnold is twice as sensation-seeking as the average person, and fully 20 percent higher than the average high sensation seeker. The most likely explanation for his flatline amygdala activation in the scanner, Joseph says, is that the tasks she set for him simply were not strong enough tea.

Honnold also scores as exceedingly conscientious, associated with the ability to concentrate, remain focused on a task, and see things through. He also surveyed high in premeditation, his typical modus operandi, and very low in neuroticism, making him unlikely to ruminate over unlikely outcomes or risks that are impossible to manage. “If you don’t have any fear to begin with,” Honnold says, “there’s a lot less to control.”

“He has the traits that enable him to be incredibly focused, and incredibly patient, but at the same time totally sensation seeking,” Joseph says.

Honnald’s most acclaimed climb is being the first free solo (climb without ropes) El Capitan. The documentary featuring this achievement, Free Solo, was recently nominated for an Oscar.

The movie is a 97 minute stress test.

Putt-Putt

Analysis: Putting with the Flagstick In

As part of the USGA’s 2019 Rule changes, there is no longer a penalty if a ball played from the putting green hits a flagstick left in the hole.

TLDR; You should leave the flagstick in.

  1. The flagstick slows the ball by a greater factor than it decreases the time the ball spends suspended over the hole.
  2. Unless you have exceptional distance control, effective capture speed can remain about the same.
  3. Hitting the ball more firmly allows for a larger margin of error. It also reduces the tendency of a slow-moving putt to "wobble" or be moved off-line due to imperfections.
  4. Players, particularly poorer putters, leave a lot of putts from 6' to 15' short. This change would let them be more aggressive.
  5. The situations where the flagstick should be removed (it leans too much, it's moving around a lot in the wind) almost never occur.
  6. The flagstick offers an aid - it gives the player yet another point or two at which to aim.

Bryson DeChambeau, the most scientific player on tour (at least boastfully), says that he will almost always leave the flagstick in because of the “coefficient of restitution”. Good to know.

“Cable Guy!”

I Was A Cable Guy. I Saw The Worst Of America.

I can’t tell you about a specific day as a cable tech. I can’t tell you my first customer was a cat hoarder. I can tell you the details, sure. That I smeared Vicks on my lip to try to cover the stench of rugs and walls and upholstery soaked in cat piss. That I wore booties, not to protect the carpets from the mud on my boots but to keep the cat piss off my soles. I can tell you the problem with her cable service was that her cats chewed through the wiring. That I had to move a mummified cat behind the television to replace the jumper. That ammonia seeped into the polyester fibers of my itchy blue uniform, clung to the sweat in my hair. That the smell stuck to me through the next job.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

January 2019

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Simply The Best

The Best Doesn’t Exist. 

People who are searching for good enough are not second-guessing themselves. When there’s any little imperfection, people who are searching for the best don’t say, “Well, the world has disappointed me.” They say, “I must have made a mistake.”

Barkley’s Bud

My Dad's Friendship With Charles Barkley

I preferred the audio version to the written article, for what it's worth.

When Charles Barkley's mother, Charcey Glenn, passed away in June 2015, Barkley's hometown of Leeds, Alabama, came to the funeral to pay respects. But there was also an unexpected guest.

Barkley’s friends couldn’t quite place him. He wasn’t a basketball player, he wasn’t a sports figure, and he wasn’t from Barkley’s hometown. Here’s what I can tell you about him: He wore striped, red polo shirts tucked into khaki shorts and got really excited about two-for-one deals. He was a commuter. He worked as a cat litter scientist in Muscatine, Iowa. In short, he was everyone’s suburban dad. More specifically, he was my dad.

"You know, it was obviously a very difficult time," Barkley told me recently. "And the next thing I know, he shows up. Everybody’s like, 'Who’s the Asian dude over there?' I just started laughing. I said, 'That’s my boy, Lin.' They’re, like, 'How do you know him?' I said, 'It’s a long story.' "

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Bill Gates’s ‘5 Books I Loved in 2018’

Three of these are definitely on my list.

  1. Educated: A Memoir
  2. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century - Yuval Noah Harari won me over with Sapiens and Homo Deus — the past and the future. Nice of him to make his next stop the present.
  3. The Headspace Guide to Meditation and Mindfulness - I’ve tried meditation and the only thing that felt like it made sense was Andy Puddicombe’s app, Headspace.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

December 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Au Revoir, Le Grand K

Mass of a Kilogram to be Redefined

Oddly enough, every measurement of mass made anywhere on Earth is tied back to this one cylindrical object. Known as “Le Grand K,” the cylinder, cast in 1879, is kept carefully sequestered in a secure, controlled environment outside Paris.

[…]

On May 20, 2019, Le Grand K will lose its special status, and the mass of a kilogram will be defined by a fundamental constant of nature known as the Planck constant. At the same time, other mainstays of the metric system will also be revamped: the ampere (the unit of electric current), the kelvin (the unit of temperature) and the mole (the unit for amount of substance).

One. Two. Ten!

Inside the Making of Home Alone’s Fake Gangster Movie

Reeking of authenticity, Angels with Filthy Souls is not just a uniquely persuasive parody. It’s the perfect movie-within-a-movie: a one-minute-and-20-second noir-in-a-nutshell that feels like a fleeting glimpse of a long-lost classic. Its dialogue is crisp, the characters and performances credible, the rapid escalation of its drama enthralling. Plus it culminates in not just the most memorable utterance in Home Alone but one of the great movie lines of all time: “Keep the change, ya filthy animal”.

Unintended Behaviors of AI

Mentioned in January’s newsletter, Nick Bostrom, a philosopher at Oxford University, has a thought experiment that goes…

Suppose we have an AI whose only goal is to make as many paper clips as possible. The AI will realize quickly that it would be much better if there were no humans because humans might decide to switch it off. Because if humans do so, there would be fewer paper clips. Also, human bodies contain a lot of atoms that could be made into paper clips. The future that the AI would be trying to gear towards would be one in which there were a lot of paper clips but no humans.

Out of Bostrom’s thought exercise came Joscha Bach’s Lebowski Theorem stating that, “No superintelligent AI is going to bother with a task that is harder than hacking its reward function.”

Victoria Krakovna has begun aggregating a list of AI who have gamed their objective or reward system.

Examples:

  • “Agent pauses the game indefinitely to avoid losing.”

  • “Agent kills itself at the end of level 1 to avoid losing in level 2.”

  • “A robotic arm trained to slide a block to a target position on a table achieves the goal by moving the table itself.”

  • “In an artificial life simulation where survival required energy but giving birth had no energy cost, one species evolved a sedentary lifestyle that consisted mostly of mating in order to produce new children which could be eaten (or used as mates to produce more edible children).”

  • “AI trained to classify skin lesions as potentially cancerous learns that lesions photographed next to a ruler are more likely to be malignant.”

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great holiday season,

Clay

November 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

“Listen, it takes a long time to go broke buying Ferraris”

What the Hell Happened to Darius Miles?

I remember one day I was running late for practice, so I was flying down the 405. All of a sudden, I look in the rearview, and I see the flashing lights. This unmarked police truck is right up on me. Tinted windows. Big heavy-duty truck. Woop-woop.

I knew I was speeding. So I pull over, and I roll the window down, and I’m reaching over into the glove compartment to get my papers ….

… Then I hear this voice. Big, booming voice.

“WHERE YOU G’WAN, BOY?”

I’m like, Damn, they got the sergeant on me or something?

I turn to look out the window, and I can’t even see this dude’s face he’s so big. All I see is his chest.

“I SAID WHERE YOU G’WAN BOY?”

Then he bends down and looks in the window.

Big, dumbass grin on his face.

It’s Shaq.

I’m like, “Yo! I’m going to practice! You made me late!”

He don’t miss a beat. He taps side of my truck, turns around and says, “Don’t worry about it. I’ll pay your fine. Just holler at me.”

I’m looking in the rearview mirror, like, How the hell …

I built a desk once…twice actually

How One Man Made Stardew Valley

Then there’s Stardew Valley—a humble, intimate farming adventure about the monotony of domestic life, in which you spend dozens of hours parenting cabbages. Eric was a team of one. It took him four and a half years to design, program, animate, draw, compose, record, and write everything in the game, working 12-hour days, seven days a week.

When I first played Stardew Valley all I wanted was to play it on an iPad. Stardew Valley for iOS was released in late October. If you do decide to give it a shot, the Wiki is required reading as far as I am concerned.

Greenland is a Poser

The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. It became the standard map projection for nautical navigation because of its ability to represent lines of constant course, known as rhumb lines or loxodromes, as straight segments that conserve the angles with the meridians. Although the linear scale is equal in all directions around any point, thus preserving the angles and the shapes of small objects (making it a conformal map projection), the Mercator projection distorts the size of objects as the latitude increases from the Equator to the poles, where the scale becomes infinite. So, for example, landmasses such as Greenland and Antarctica appear much larger than they actually are, relative to landmasses near the equator such as Central Africa.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

October 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Ping of Pong

The Tables

A look at the powerful connection between a pair of outdoor ping pong tables in the heart of New York City and the unlikely group of people they’ve brought together, from homeless people to investment bankers to gangbangers.

COFH, BIRF, CORS

The Unique Neurology of the Sports Fan’s Brain

Affiliation with sports teams, it seems, is a contemporary form of tribalism. “Our sports heroes are our warriors,” Cialdini once remarked. And tribal affiliation, along with satisfying our need for a sense of belonging, produces another social pleasure that’s not so warm and fuzzy: the good vibes of walloping your opponent. It’s what Germans call schadenfreude, literally “harm-joy,” the pleasure derived from others’ misfortune.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

September 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Dun-Dun—Dunnnn

An Oral History of ‘GoldenEye 007’ on the N64

GoldenEye 007 was originally planned to be a 2D, single-player side-scrolling game, much like Donkey Kong, another game that British developers Rare were producing at the time for the SNES. However, lead developer Martin Hollis suggested it be a 3D first-person shooter for the Nintendo 64, a system and technology that didn’t even fully exist yet. He got his way, and assembled a ragtag team of new-to-gaming developers to begin working on what was expected to be “just another film license” game — games that typically rode the movie’s fame, but didn’t prove to be smash hits, critically or commercially.

And just to cut to the chase…

Oddjob is cheating: He is banned. That said, I have only played with a caliber of people who would never consider choosing him, so it has never been an issue.

Rich Uncle Pennybags

How an Ex-Cop Rigged McDonald’s Monopoly Game and Stole Millions

Jerome Jacobson and his network of mobsters, psychics, strip-club owners, and drug traffickers won almost every prize for 12 years, until the FBI launched Operation ‘Final Answer.’

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

August 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Home is Where the Dryptosaurus is

Locate modern addresses on Earth 750 million years ago

300 million years ago the current location of my home emerged from the sea. Some of my neighbors may have also arrived at that time.

Good Design is as Little Design as Possible

Ten Principles for Good Design

Gary Hustwit has a documentary about designer Dieter Rams coming out soon.

From objects to influence, Rams’ contribution to our everyday lives is expansive.

“Dieter Rams’ ability to bring form to a product so that it clearly, concisely and immediately communicates its meaning is remarkable… He remains utterly alone in producing a body of work so consistently beautiful, so right, and so accessible.” – Jonathan Ive, Apple’s Chief Design Officer

Bo-Yo

Good One: Can’t Handle This

A part of me loves you,
A part of me hates you,
A part of me needs you,
A part of me fears you.

In this podcast, Jesse David Fox and Bo Burnham discuss the finale to Bo’s special, ‘Make Happy’. In an auto-tuned Kanye-esque rant we hear about Pringles, Chipotle, and Bo’s view of the audience and performing.

Bo has directed a movie called Eighth Grade receiving tremendous acclaim. The production company for the film, A24, has had recent success with Ladybird, Moonlight, The Disaster Artist, The Killing of a Sacred Deer, Ex Machina, and The Lobster.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Bill Gates has his 5 books worth reading this summer.

I’ve read some terrific books lately. When I pulled together this list of five that you might enjoy this summer, I realized that several of my choices wrestle with big questions. What makes a genius tick? Why do bad things happen to good people? Where does humanity come from, and where are we headed?

I’m in the middle of Factfulness. Gates provides some great notes about the book.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

July 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

The Cup and the Ball

How the New World Cup Ball was Designed to Not Influence the Games

The Telstar 18, the design for the 2018 World Cup in Russia, is as close to a perfect sphere as you can get. It has subtle pimples and six thermally bonded panels designed to avoid knuckling, which is the characteristic bobbing and weaving movement when a ball is kicked without spin. All 32 teams have been able to play with it since November in preparation for the tournament, which runs from June 14 to July 15. But despite its similarities to the old ball, players have grumbled about the Telstar 18. Compared to the last few World Cup balls, the Telstar 18 is very similar to the ball used for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. It won’t fly quite as far down the pitch, and will wobble in the air a little differently, but aerodynamic testing suggests it will be more stable in the air overall.

“As god as my witness, he is broken in half!”

Hell in a Cell, The Whole Story

We have just ‘celebrated’ the 20 year anniversary of The Undertaker vs. Mankind in Hell in a Cell. I have known the phrase, “In 1998 The Undertaker threw Mankind off Hell in a Cell.” as a meme. What I didn’t know is how absolutely insane the events of this match were.

Body Issues

ESPN The Body Issue

As if watching professional athletes be nearly perfect at their sport wasn’t enough...

Don’t miss previous issues in their Body Issue Archive.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

In his second book, Living with the Monks, Itzler goes to live on a monastery for 15 days. This is the follow up book to one of my favorite books, Living with a SEAL.

Living with the Monks

Getting over the fear of being embarrassed is one of the most liberating gifts you can give yourself.
- Jesse Itzler

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

June 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Architectural and Interiors Photographers

I’ve found myself going off the deep end of architectural and interiors photography in the last few weeks. Below are a few links to some work I’ve been admiring.

Zip It...

Zip it real good

Don’t ever expect to see how zippers are made at YKK. Founded in 1934, Yoshida Kōgyō Kabushikigaisha is the world’s zipper kingpin, and it keeps its manufacturing secrets under lock and key. As John Balzar explains in the Los Angeles Times, that’s partly because YKK makes everything—and we mean everything—on its own.

“YKK smelts its own brass, concocts its own polyester, spins and twists its own thread, weaves and color-dyes cloth for its zipper tapes, forges and molds its scooped zipper teeth, extrudes the monofilament for coil zippers, hammers and paints the sliders, clamps the stops, attaches the dangley pulls in a thousand varieties, and even fabricates the cardboard boxes in which zippers are packaged. Naturally, YKK makes the machines that make the components.”

Since YKK controls all aspects of its business, it’s widely viewed by design companies as the most dependable and consistent zipper brand on the planet. (Case in point: At Slate, Seth Stevenson points out that “When the Japanese earthquake hit in 2011 many supply chains were shredded, but YKK kept rolling along.”) For that reason alone, YKK is a major player in the (very niche) high-end zipper market.

I never knew there was so much to know about zippers.

Are you my friend?

Study reveals how many hours it takes to make friends.

In a new report published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Associate Professor of Communication Studies Jeffrey Hall found that it takes roughly 50 hours of time together to move from mere acquaintance to casual friend, 90 hours to go from that stage to simple “friend” status and more than 200 hours before you can consider someone your close friend.

This means time spent hanging out, joking around, playing video games and the like. Hours spent working together just don’t count as much, Hall’s study found.

Hall’s colleagues developed an ”Interactive Friendship Tool” to guess whether someone is an acquaintance, casual friend, friend or close friend.

Around The Web

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

May 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

“Hey Watson, what’s my personality?”

IBM Watson’s Personality Insights

A well-accepted theory of psychology, marketing, and other fields is that human language reflects personality, thinking style, social connections, and emotional states. The frequency with which we use certain categories of words can provide clues to these characteristics. Several researchers found that variations in word usage in writings such as blogs, essays, and tweets can predict aspects of personality.

IBM conducted a set of studies to understand whether personality characteristics inferred from social media data can predict people's behavior and preferences.

40 Year Anthem

“Y.M.C.A.”

It was 1977, and we were leaving a photography session on 23rd Street. Jacques Morali saw the big pink YMCA on 23rd and asked, “What is this YMCA, anyway? “And after laughing at his accent, we told him the Y was a place where you could go when you first came to New York when you didn’t have any money — you can stay there for very little. And of course, someone joked, “Yeah, but don’t bend over in the showers. “And Jacques, bless his heart, said, “I will write a song about this!”

Om Nom

The Extraordinary Science of Addictive Junk Food

Frito-Lay had a formidable research complex near Dallas, where nearly 500 chemists, psychologists and technicians conducted research that cost up to $30 million a year, and the science corps focused intense amounts of resources on questions of crunch, mouth feel and aroma for each of these items. Their tools included a $40,000 device that simulated a chewing mouth to test and perfect the chips, discovering things like the perfect break point: people like a chip that snaps with about four pounds of pressure per square inch.

To get a better feel for their work, I called on Steven Witherly, a food scientist who wrote a fascinating guide for industry insiders titled, “Why Humans Like Junk Food.” I brought him two shopping bags filled with a variety of chips to taste. He zeroed right in on the Cheetos. “This,” Witherly said, “is one of the most marvelously constructed foods on the planet, in terms of pure pleasure.” He ticked off a dozen attributes of the Cheetos that make the brain say more. But the one he focused on most was the puff’s uncanny ability to melt in the mouth. “It’s called vanishing caloric density,” Witherly said. “If something melts down quickly, your brain thinks that there’s no calories in it… you can just keep eating it forever.”

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts

We deify willpower and self-control, and mock its absence. People who achieve through remarkable willpower are “strong” and “heroic.” People who need help or structure are “weak.” This is crazy—because few of us can accurately gauge or predict our willpower. We not only overestimate it, we chronically underestimate the power of triggers in our environment to lead us astray. Our environment is a magnificent willpower-reduction machine.

- Marshall Goldsmith

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

April 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood

Can you say…Hero?

I would usually put a brief pull quote or my favorite remarks from the article here but, set aside half an hour and read this. You will feel a refreshed sense of care and peace.

In celebration of Mister Rogers’ 90th birthday and the 50th year anniversary of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood:

Last Man Standing

Fortnite vs. PUBG

There are an insane number of people playing both PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds (over 30 million players) and Fortnite (over 45 million players).

Both games are also pulling wild viewership numbers on Twitch. In February, Twitch streamed 65.44 million hours of Fortnite gameplay and 43.33 million hours of PUBG gameplay. 600,000 people watched Ninja stream Fortnite with Drake…at 3am…on a Thursday.

I think it is widely agreed that Fortnite is a better game. Fortnite is a blast but it never feels high stakes. In PUBG I can hear my pulse. No, not my character’s pulse - my actual beating heart pounding in my ears.

Phony

Millions Are Hounded for Debt They Don’t Owe. One Victim Fought Back, With a Vengeance.

“When the scammers started to hound Therrien, he hounded them right back. Obsessed with payback, he spent hundreds of hours investigating the dirty side of debt. By day he was still promoting ice cream brands and hiring models for liquor store tastings. But in his spare time, he was living out a revenge fantasy. He befriended loan sharks and blackmailed crooked collectors, getting them to divulge their suppliers, and then their suppliers above them. In method, Therrien was like a prosecutor flipping gangster underlings to get to lieutenants and then the boss. In spirit, he was a bit like Liam Neeson’s vigilante character in the movie Taken—using unflagging aggression to obtain scraps of information and reverse-engineer a criminal syndicate. Therrien didn’t punch anyone in the head, of course. He was simply unstoppable over the phone.”

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Ego is the Enemy

The question to ask, when you feel pride, then, is this: What am I missing right now that a more humble person might see?
- Ryan Holiday

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

March 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Slurp

The Amazing History and the Strange Invention of the Bendy Straw

Friedman inserted a screw into the straw toward the top (see image). Then he wrapped dental floss around the paper, tracing grooves made by the inserted screw. Finally, he removed the screw, leaving a accordion-like ridge in the middle of the once-straight straw. Voila! he had created a straw that could bend around its grooves to reach a child’s face over the edge of a glass.

Friedman filed for the patent on a “Drinking tube” in 1936.

The main object of my invention is to provide a soda straw or similar drinking tube with a flexible section so positioned that the tube may be bent during use without substantially reducing the diameter of the straw.

Olympic HQ

Set, Put, Run

A Verb for Our Frantic Times

HER birthday: must set plans in motion. Run a bath, put on cologne, set the table. High anxiety. Run down list: set watch again, put water in glasses, set flowers. Run to the window — phew! Watch her put a finger to the doorbell. Such joy! What timing! And just as the sun sets, too!

Thus does an evening beckon, full of pleasantry and promise. But as described here it notes events in a manner of considerable interest for the lexicographer. For scattered within the vocabulary of this 54-word drama are 11 uses of the three most complex verbs in the English language: “set,” “put” and “run.”

Reason to Forget

Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read…and the movies and TV shows we watch

In the internet age, recall memory — the ability to spontaneously call information up in your mind — has become less necessary. It’s still good for bar trivia, or remembering your to-do list, but largely, Horvath says, what’s called recognition memory is more important. “So long as you know where that information is at and how to access it, then you don’t really need to recall it,” he says.

Research has shown that the internet functions as a sort of externalized memory. “When people expect to have future access to information, they have lower rates of recall of the information itself,” as one study puts it.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

This book is atop almost every ‘greatest books’ list I have ever seen.

Man’s Search for Meaning

Man does not simply exist but always decides what his existence will be, what he will become in the next moment.

By the same token, every human being has the freedom to change at any instant. Therefore, we can predict his future only within the large framework of a statistical survey referring to a whole group; the individual personality, however, remains essentially unpredictable. The basis for any predictions would be represented by biological, psychological or sociological conditions. Yet one of the main features of human existence is the capacity to rise above such conditions, to grow beyond them. Man is capable of changing the world for the better if possible, and of changing himself for the better if necessary.
- Viktor Frankl

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

February 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

Prime Time

50th Known Mersenne Prime Discovered: 2^77,232,917-1

The new prime number, also known as M77232917, is calculated by multiplying together 77,232,917 twos, and then subtracting one. It is nearly one million digits larger than the previous record prime number, in a special class of extremely rare prime numbers known as Mersenne primes. It is only the 50th known Mersenne prime ever discovered, each increasingly difficult to find. Mersenne primes were named for the French monk Marin Mersenne, who studied these numbers more than 350 years ago.

Trashed

Inside the Deadly World of Private Garbage Collection

Waste and recycling work is the fifth most fatal job in America — far more deadly than serving as a police officer or a firefighter. Loggers have the highest fatality rate, followed by fishing workers, aircraft pilots and roofers. From the collection out on garbage trucks, to the processing at transfer stations and recycling centers, to the dumping at landfills, the waste industry averages about one worker fatality a week. Nationally, in 2016, 82 percent of waste-worker deaths occurred in the private sector.

From Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging:

The public is often accused of being disconnected from its military, but frankly, it’s disconnected from just about everything. Farming, mineral extraction, gas and oil production, bulk cargo transport, logging, fishing, infrastructure construction—all the industries that keep the nation going are mostly unacknowledged by the people who depend on them most.
- Sebastian Junger

You Will Never See the Same

When Your Eyes Move, So Do Your Eardrums

Without moving your head, look to your left. Now look to your right. Keep flicking your eyes back and forth, left and right.

Even if you managed to keep the rest of your body completely still, your eyeballs were not the only parts of your head that just moved. Your ears did, too. Specifically, your eardrums—the thin membranes inside each of your ears—wobbled. As your eyes flitted right, both eardrums bulged to the left, one inward and one outward. They then bounced back and forth a few times, before coming to a halt. When you looked left, they bulged to the right, and oscillated again.

[…]

They also found that the eardrums start to wobble about 10 milliseconds before the eyes. This suggests that the ears aren’t reacting to what’s happening in the eyes. Instead, Groh says, “the brain is saying: I am about to move the eyes; ears, get ready.”

And while we are on the subject of hearing, find out why nature sounds can help you sleep and relax.

As life evolved on Earth, living beings developed different sensory organs to guide them toward food, alert them to danger, and find their way around the world. Without these senses, we couldn’t have survived. But sometimes, these very senses can cause our minds to get over-stimulated. When there’s too much noise, for example, it can be really distressing, but we usually can’t just turn off our hearing.

From an evolutionary standpoint, this is beneficial to us. If there’s some danger in our environment, we can act accordingly (or wake up, if we happen to be asleep). Sudden sounds jolt us into action, get our hearts pumping, and the adrenaline and cortisol soaring in our bodies so as to prepare us for fight or flight.

But living in a stream of constant, jarring noises can be highly toxic. One of the biggest problems with urban soundscapes, according to Benfield, is that people think they’ve adjusted to them.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

Ryan Holiday translates stoic ideas into modern language. I highly recommend The Obstacle is the Way or Ego is the Enemy.

The Obstacle is the Way: The Timeless Art of Turning Trials into Triumph

During the good times, we strengthen ourselves and our bodies so that during the difficult times, we can depend on it.
- Ryan Holiday

Get a copy here.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay

January 2018

This newsletter is a collection of things I have found in the last month that I enjoyed, found interesting, or simply wanted to share.

You can follow me more closely at my personal website or if you or someone you know is looking to buy or sell a home, you can point them to my real estate website.

The Way The World Ends: Not With A Bang But A Paperclip

Wired takes a look at Paperclips, a clicker game from Frank Lantz based on speculations in Nick Bostrom’s Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies.

In a Huffington Post interview, Bostrom makes his point much more succinctly, albeit less thorough, than a game or his book:

Suppose we have an AI whose only goal is to make as many paper clips as possible. The AI will realize quickly that it would be much better if there were no humans because humans might decide to switch it off. Because if humans do so, there would be fewer paper clips. Also, human bodies contain a lot of atoms that could be made into paper clips. The future that the AI would be trying to gear towards would be one in which there were a lot of paper clips but no humans.

Born To Be Chased

Plant Earth II has been added to Netflix. Just as interesting as the action on screen is the action behind the camera. Early last year, Vox went behind the scenes to show how the famous ‘Snake Island’ chase was filmed.

Bits from Books

This is my second year compiling some of my favorite passages from books I’ve read throughout the year.

Around The Web

Book ‘Em

A Seth Godin quote from Tim Ferris’ book, Tools of Titans:

‘First, Ten,’ and it is a simple theory of marketing that says: tell ten people, show ten people, share it with ten people; ten people who already trust you and already like you. If they don’t tell anybody else, it’s not that good and you should start over. If they do tell other people, you’re on your way.”

I suppose my hope is that 10 of you might share this first issue as a way of showing me you have enjoyed it.

Sign Off

Do not hesitate to reply to this months email to share links, wisdom, or thoughts.

Thanks for reading. Have a great month,

Clay